Title:

Research Associate Professor

Office Information:

70 MacNider Hall
UNC at Chapel Hill
Chapel Hill, NC 27599-7575
(919) 966-9447

Education:

BS, Physical Anthropology Moscow State University, USSR
PhD, Physiology, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
Post-doctoral Fellowship, Neurophysiology, 1985 - 1986, Rockefeller University, New York, NY
Post-doctoral Fellowship, Neurophysiology, 1986 - 1988, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

Email:

favorov@email.unc.edu

Research and Publications:

Neurobiology
Neural bases of perception; somatosensory cortical physiology; pattern recognition; neurobiology

My primary research interests are:
· Neural bases of perception, with special emphasis on the relationship between patterns of neuroelectrical activity in the somatosensory cerebral cortex and tactile perception
· Cortical information processing, with an emphasis on those computational algorithms that enable the cerebral cortex to recognize high-order regularities in observed phenomena and to take advantage of them in perceptual and decision-making tasks
· Physiological mechanisms responsible for generation of neuroelectrical activity in the cerebral cortex
· Computational algorithms for multivariate data analysis, machine learning, pattern recognition, and knowledge acquisition.


I have been actively involved in developing novel algorithms for understanding complex biomedical processes since 1980. One focus has been on in vivo neurophysiological research and the neural basis of perception. My group studies the relationship between patterns of neuroelectrical activity in the somatosensory cerebral cortex and tactile perception, the physiological mechanisms responsible for generation of neuroelectrical activity in the cerebral cortex, and cortical information processing. In order to understand the functional significance of the experimentally observed cortical activity patterns, I also do mathematical modeling of cortical networks. My group has developed computational algorithms that analyze how the cerebral cortex is able to recognize higher-order regularities in observed phenomena and how these patterns are used in perceptual and decision-making tasks. As an outgrowth of this research, I have also been involved in creating general-purpose innovative and advanced digital signal processing and information extraction algorithms.


PubMed