Research and Publications:

Bio: Dr. Janie Fouke has long been active in the field of biomedical engineering. After completing her undergraduate education at St. Andrews Presbyterian College in Laurinburg, North Carolina, she earned her M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in biomedical mathematics and medical engineering at UNC in 1980 and 1982, respectively. From 1981 to 1999, Dr. Fouke rose through the faculty ranks at Case Western Reserve University with teaching and research interests in medical instrument design and development. Her work has been critical to the understanding of the etiology of airway diseases such as asthma and the pulmonary effects of environmental pollutants. Subsequently, she served as Dean of the College of Engineering at Michigan State University, Provost and Senior Vice President for academic affairs at the University of Florida, and Dean of the College of Engineering at Nanyang Technological University in Singapore. Dr. Fouke currently works as a consultant to Colorado School of Mines as they develop a partnership with an Asian university. Dr. Fouke has played major leadership roles in the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers, the Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society and the American Society for Engineering Education. She was the inaugural division director of the division of bioengineering and environmental systems of the National Science Foundation. She has served on advisory boards for numerous universities and federal agencies. Dr. Fouke is a prolific scholar. Her book Engineering Tomorrow (2000) received the Dexter Prize, given annually by the Society for the History of Technology as the single best book published during the preceding three years. She is a Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science, the American Institute for Medical and Biological Engineering, the Institute for Electrical and Electronics Engineers, the Biomedical Engineering Society and the American Society for Engineering Education. Her students have had diverse career experiences, for instance, developing medical technology at companies such as Medtronic, advising on medical product regulation at agencies such as the Food and Drug Administration, and contributing to the development of medical policy in various legislative offices.